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May 25, 2011 at 6:36 AM

indiaincredible:

Sikh Holy Book..

indiaincredible:

Sikh Holy Book..

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May 19, 2011 at 12:44 PM

illusionsperdues:

A Shuudoushi monk at the Kiyomizudera temple, Kyoto, Japan

illusionsperdues:

A Shuudoushi monk at the Kiyomizudera temple, Kyoto, Japan

(Source: stumbleupon, via goodmemory)

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May 15, 2011 at 8:26 PM

cing-cangkeling11:

Lord, Hear My Prayer. (by livetowander)

cing-cangkeling11:

Lord, Hear My Prayer. (by livetowander)

(via pakse)

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Photo

May 15, 2011 at 7:05 PM

touba:


“Spinning their way with each step, two elderly pilgrims pick their way down from Hemis Gompa. The devout believe that each revolution of the scripture-filled copper wheels sends supplications heavenward.”

Photograph by Thomas J. Abercrombie for National Geographic, March 1978.

touba:

“Spinning their way with each step, two elderly pilgrims pick their way down from Hemis Gompa. The devout believe that each revolution of the scripture-filled copper wheels sends supplications heavenward.”

Photograph by Thomas J. Abercrombie for National Geographic, March 1978.

(via highgatedreams)

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May 13, 2011 at 8:40 PM

learningtosee:

TIBET 05  Many pilgrams carry oil for the lamps as they visit all possible shrines in each temple they visit. For me, there is a sense of both dedication and of the pleasure involved in making an offering in this image.

learningtosee:

TIBET 05  Many pilgrams carry oil for the lamps as they visit all possible shrines in each temple they visit. For me, there is a sense of both dedication and of the pleasure involved in making an offering in this image.

(via goodmemory)

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May 11, 2011 at 11:30 PM

eclecticmusing:

indigenousdialogues:

quickwitter:

maizans: verdantdruid: threats: 8o8: kihachi: goodmemory: appuntinovalis: falcemartello: (via sebseballade)

In the Name of GodThe Ramnamis are a group of untouchables from central India. Banned from entering temples along with other Hindus, they decided to tattoo God’s name (Ram) all over their faces and bodies. A message to say that they ‘could have God with them too’, and it angered the upper-castes who felt that they were polluting God’s name with their untouchable bodies. photographed by Olivia Arthur

eclecticmusing:

indigenousdialogues:

quickwitter:

maizans: verdantdruid: threats: 8o8: kihachi: goodmemory: appuntinovalis: falcemartello: (via sebseballade)

In the Name of God
The Ramnamis are a group of untouchables from central India. Banned from entering temples along with other Hindus, they decided to tattoo God’s name (Ram) all over their faces and bodies. A message to say that they ‘could have God with them too’, and it angered the upper-castes who felt that they were polluting God’s name with their untouchable bodies. photographed by Olivia Arthur

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Photo

May 11, 2011 at 4:43 AM

regardintemporel:

John Gutmann - The Confessional, Mexico, 1960

regardintemporel:

John Gutmann - The Confessional, Mexico, 1960

(via dreaminginthedeepsouth)

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May 10, 2011 at 11:07 PM

justcallmegrace:

Umbrella for sun or rain by B℮n

justcallmegrace:

Umbrella for sun or rain by B℮n

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May 10, 2011 at 10:55 PM

lucifelle:

Hindu priest smokes marijuana during the trip to Calcutta, where he will participate in traditional swim in the river Ganges during the religious festival Makarsankranti.

lucifelle:

Hindu priest smokes marijuana during the trip to Calcutta, where he will participate in traditional swim in the river Ganges during the religious festival Makarsankranti.

(via goodmemory)

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May 2, 2011 at 11:00 PM

(via eclecticmusing)

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April 30, 2011 at 4:44 PM

petitcabinetdecuriosites:
miss-mary-quite-contrary:
afghanipoppy:urbanjunky:
Picture taken in Nepal by Jean-Marie Hullo
The picture above shows a young girl being prepared for Ihi Ceremony in Kathmandu Durbar Square.The gods of Nepal do not represent a forgotten era of the past. The deities here are living, and participate in the ordinary existence of everyday life as much as we mere mortals do. Nowhere is this exemplified more charmingly than in the uniquely Nepalese custom of Bel-Marriage (Ihi ceremony). Traditionally the Newars (the predominant ethnic group of the valley), marry off their pre-pubescent girls to a fruit of the Bel tree which symbolizes Lord Vishnu himself. The marriage ceremony is elaborate, accompanied by a feast.By this custom, if a Newari’s future mortal husband should die, she is not considered a widow because she is still married to Vishnu. The Newar “widow” therefore undergoes none of the often disagreeable sanctions imposed on widows.So this explains the reason behind those smartly dressed adolescent girls, thronging the streets of Kathmandu, who in spite of not being married in the ‘earthly’ sense, nevertheless adorn their foreheads with thick swabs of vermilion associated in India solely with a married status.(via zjta)

petitcabinetdecuriosites:

miss-mary-quite-contrary:

afghanipoppy:urbanjunky:

Picture taken in Nepal by Jean-Marie Hullo

The picture above shows a young girl being prepared for Ihi Ceremony in Kathmandu Durbar Square.The gods of Nepal do not represent a forgotten era of the past. The deities here are living, and participate in the ordinary existence of everyday life as much as we mere mortals do. Nowhere is this exemplified more charmingly than in the uniquely Nepalese custom of Bel-Marriage (Ihi ceremony). Traditionally the Newars (the predominant ethnic group of the valley), marry off their pre-pubescent girls to a fruit of the Bel tree which symbolizes Lord Vishnu himself. The marriage ceremony is elaborate, accompanied by a feast.By this custom, if a Newari’s future mortal husband should die, she is not considered a widow because she is still married to Vishnu. The Newar “widow” therefore undergoes none of the often disagreeable sanctions imposed on widows.So this explains the reason behind those smartly dressed adolescent girls, thronging the streets of Kathmandu, who in spite of not being married in the ‘earthly’ sense, nevertheless adorn their foreheads with thick swabs of vermilion associated in India solely with a married status.(via zjta)

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April 30, 2011 at 4:33 PM

(via petitcabinetdecuriosites)

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April 30, 2011 at 4:29 PM

fuckyeahethnicmen:

 
Great Father by Joey Lawrence
This Brahmin has practiced an ascetic life since the age of five

fuckyeahethnicmen:

Great Father by Joey Lawrence

This Brahmin has practiced an ascetic life since the age of five

(via indigenousdialogues)

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